Will Web Chat Take Over the Healthcare Call Center?

By Peter L DeHaan, Ph.D.

Peter DeHaan, publisher and editorWith the Millennial generation’s love for texting and general avoidance of placing a phone call, it’s tempting to project the demise of the call center. Although this may make for a logical conclusion, it’s not going to happen any time soon. Though tomorrow’s healthcare call center will undoubtedly have more chat transactions than it does now, the telephone will remain its primary communication device.

Why?

The reason is the simple fact that calls are superior in several key situations, and these significant advantages will not go away any time soon.

Talking is More Effective: Speaking is faster than typing. When describing complex medical situations, speaking our words is more effective than typing them. With the status of our health at stake, we want to communicate quickly and to get it right the first time. The telephone allows us to do this.

Our Tone Carries Meaning: Emotions are easier to communicate verbally and to be understood. Humor, desperation, and pain do not come across well in written form. How many times have you had a text message or email be misunderstood because your tone of voice did not come across?

Likewise, healthcare provider empathy comes across better when talking, instead of typing. It’s hard to communicate compassion through a chat box.

Yes, we do have emojis, a graphical representation of various emotional states, yet emojis are prone to misunderstandings, offering confusion almost as often as clarity.

Pick Up the Phone: In stressful situations, people of all generations, will gravitate to the phone. It provides for fast and efficient communication in time-critical, stressful situations. Often, when people reach out for medical help, the situation is both time-critical and stressful. The telephone offers a simple, no-hassle way to communicate. That’s why it’s the go-to tool for difficult situations.

Yes, texting is the newer technology that all the cool kids use, while the telephone seems stodgy and old school in comparison. Yet when critical, timely, and accurate communication is essential, the telephone wins most every time.

In the future, your healthcare call center will undoubtedly handle more chat communications. However, the telephone will continue to ring for most situations.

To prepare for the future, embrace chat technology, if you haven’t already done so. But don’t lose sight of the telephone. It will continue to be the cornerstone of your healthcare call center operation for many years to come.

Peter DeHaan is the publisher and editor of Medical Call Center News and AnswerStat.

The November 2017 Issue



Will Web Chat Take Over the Healthcare Call Center?

By Peter L DeHaan, Ph.D.

Peter DeHaan, publisher and editorWith the Millennial generation’s love for texting and general avoidance of placing a phone call, it’s tempting to project the demise of the call center. Although this may make for a logical conclusion, it’s not going to happen any time soon. Though tomorrow’s healthcare call center will undoubtedly have more chat transactions than it does now, the telephone will remain its primary communication device.

Why?

The reason is the simple fact that calls are superior in several key situations, and these significant advantages will not go away any time soon.

Talking is More Effective: Speaking is faster than typing. When describing complex medical situations, speaking our words is more effective than typing them. With the status of our health at stake, we want to communicate quickly and to get it right the first time. The telephone allows us to do this.

Our Tone Carries Meaning: Emotions are easier to communicate verbally and to be understood. Humor, desperation, and pain do not come across well in written form. How many times have you had a text message or email be misunderstood because your tone of voice did not come across?

Likewise, healthcare provider empathy comes across better when talking, instead of typing. It’s hard to communicate compassion through a chat box.

Yes, we do have emojis, a graphical representation of various emotional states, yet emojis are prone to misunderstandings, offering confusion almost as often as clarity.

Pick Up the Phone: In stressful situations, people of all generations, will gravitate to the phone. It provides for fast and efficient communication in time-critical, stressful situations. Often, when people reach out for medical help, the situation is both time-critical and stressful. The telephone offers a simple, no-hassle way to communicate. That’s why it’s the go-to tool for difficult situations.

Yes, texting is the newer technology that all the cool kids use, while the telephone seems stodgy and old school in comparison. Yet when critical, timely, and accurate communication is essential, the telephone wins most every time.

In the future, your healthcare call center will undoubtedly handle more chat communications. However, the telephone will continue to ring for most situations.

To prepare for the future, embrace chat technology, if you haven’t already done so. But don’t lose sight of the telephone. It will continue to be the cornerstone of your healthcare call center operation for many years to come.

Peter DeHaan is the publisher and editor of Medical Call Center News and AnswerStat.


Telehealth: The Future of Telecommunications in the Healthcare Industry

By Vicotria Rodriguez

Around sixty years ago when someone in your family was sick, you called a doctor. The doctor would show up at your doorstep a few hours later with his duffle bag of medical equipment ready to diagnose and treat. Today the face of the healthcare industry has changed significantly as the introduction of telehealth and telemedicine solutions arise.

Telehealth is the use of medical information shared from one site to another using electronic communications to improve patient’s clinical health status. With the rise of healthcare costs and physician shortages, there are too many healthcare losses. Telehealth is the perfect resolution and provides a convenient, timesaving experience for both healthcare professionals and patients. It is easily accessed through basic technology like a telephone, internet, or computer.

According to the American Association of Medical colleges, there will be a shortage of 46,000 to 90,000 primary care physicians by 2025. While this is a significant problem for the entire healthcare system, it’s specifically an issue for those in rural areas, that are already underserved.

This is where telehealth especially comes in handy, due to its ability to be at patients’ fingertips anywhere, anytime. Typically, these sessions involve the physician reviewing an electronic medical record that contains the patient’s history, lab findings, x-rays, and other medical testing done in typical medical centers.

Telehealth is an expansion to small practices and many specialties including allergy and immunology, anesthesia, cardiology, critical care, dentistry, dermatology, internal medicine, neurology, pediatrics, psychiatry, and urology.

Telehealth providers can deliver the same care that an in-person provider can, with 86 percent of physicians saying they were satisfied with the quality of care provided while utilizing a telehealth system. While there are many arguments opposing the accuracy of the telehealth experience, it’s here to stay and will become more of an asset to telecommunication as technology advances.

Victoria Rodriguez is marketing specialist for Call 4 Health, a leading medical call center that serves the healthcare industry and offers telemedicine services


10 Signs That It May Be Time to Outsource Your Hospital Call Center

By Keith Slater

Healthcare executives may not know when it’s time to pull the plug on a deficient in-house call center and outsource to a professional hospital call center. Here are ten signs that it might be time:

  1. You Miss Key Call Center Benchmarks: If 5 percent or more of patients hang up before they’re helped, hold times are longer than 60 seconds, or call routing accuracy is under 99 percent, your call center may be understaffed or lacking training.
  2. Patient Satisfaction Scores Are Dropping: In healthcare, 96 percent of patient complaints relate to customer service. If your scores are trending down, your call center may be a big part of the problem.
  3. High Call Center Staff Turnover: Many healthcare providers fill call center jobs with entry-level people who have front desk or scheduling knowhow rather than professional customer service experience. As a result, people leave for a nominal pay increase somewhere else. Others are terminated because they don’t have the skills or empathy to handle patients.
  4. You Don’t Review Recorded Calls: The key to a successful call center is to reduce variation by scripting and enforcing telephone protocols. Often, healthcare leaders don’t have the time or technical telephony resources to evaluate service quality. This exacerbates patient dissatisfaction and leads to complaints.
  5. Call Center Staff Doesn’t Receive Ongoing Training: A lack of training affects patient satisfaction. It also leads to a revolving door of frustrated employees who feel unprepared to deliver quality service. Continuous quality improvement, agent coaching, and reinforcement training is key to lower turnover and increase patient satisfaction.
  6. You Don’t Track Revenue Losses from Patient Leakage: Loyalty is less important to patients than convenience. To protect and grow revenue, healthcare providers must monitor appointment volume, chase no-shows, and proactively call patients to encourage preventive care or return visits. Few providers have the staff to do so.  
  7. Referring Providers Are Frustrated: If a referring provider can’t get through to make an appointment for their own patients, it puts revenue and future physician referrals at risk. Many healthcare organizations don’t have the resources to handle these calls any differently than patient calls. This results in resorting to archaic processes such as voicemail and faxing referrals.
  8. Inconsistent Patient Experience: A seamless patient experience is especially important in large healthcare systems. Without an efficient centralized call center, patients must make multiple calls or be routed from one department to another with inconsistent service and procedures.
  9. Poor Data Entry: When internal call center representatives fail to verify insurance, set payment expectations, or enter patient information correctly, it can lead to rejected claims, more work on the backend, and patient frustration.
  10. Providers Face Work Overload and Unbalanced Schedules: Physicians deal daily with the chronic strains of working with too many patients and having frequent stressful encounters with both patients and staff. If your internal call center has insufficient resources to manage large patient volumes, your providers can be at risk for burnout. In addition to focusing on patient satisfaction, it’s equally important to improve provider satisfaction to retain top medical talent.

Since a majority of patient care occurs in physician offices and patients must call for an appointment or to have questions answered, why risk using inadequate internal resources to manage an in-house call center? Instead consider outsourcing to a professional healthcare call center that’s up to the challenge.

Keith Slater is vice president of business development at Change Healthcare. Contact him at performanceinfo@mckesson.com. Download their new e-book to learn more about industry insights into patient satisfaction and key strategies to improving the total patient experience. For more information on outsourcing your medical call center, visit www.mckesson.com/callcenter.


Healthcare Call Center News

TriageLogic Integrates Nurse Triage Software with Salesforce

TriageLogic© introduced a Salesforce integrated version of their nurse triage module. With MyTriageChecklist, the new comprehensive triage module, medical call centers with Salesforce can add nurse triage protocols to create a clinical call center out of the box. TriageLogic will be at Dreamforce November 6-9 to announce the new version of MyTriageChecklist at the largest enterprise software conference in the world.

Salesforce has recently gained momentum in providing the healthcare industry with their CRM platform to improve the patient experience. However, there is no actual clinical content in Salesforce. This is why TriageLogic and Silverline teamed up to develop a seamlessly integrated nurse triage module for Salesforce. With MyTriageChecklist, providers can access gold-standard Schmitt-Thompson protocols directly in their Salesforce platform to provide patients with quality nurse triage services.

“With the current trend in healthcare, having nurse advice available to every patient is critical to provide cost-effective, compassionate care. By integrating this module into Salesforce, any organization can set up a clinical call center,” said Ravi Raheja, MD, medical director for TriageLogic.

Some of the key highlights of this robust module include:

  • Nurse triage protocols from Schmitt-Thompson, daytime and after-hours
  • Preconfigured to work seamlessly inside Salesforce
  • The fastest and most efficient interface in the industry
  • Medication dosage charts; click to add to triage documentation
  • Email and text handouts and encounter-specific care advice to callers

Visit www.triagelogic.com for more information.

2017 1Call Leadership and Training Seminar Wrap-Up

The 1Call Division of Amtelco completed another successful 1Call Leadership and Training Seminar. 1Call customers, along with prospects and Amtelco staff, gathered in Madison, Wisconsin, September 12–14, 2017, to experience sessions to help healthcare organizations enhance their enterprise-wide communications.

After the informative “Generations Collide” keynote presentation by Chad Kopitzke of NeXtGen Advantage, attendees learned about Genesis, MergeComm, and miTeamWeb, along with new features for miSecureMessages and the Intelligent Series. In addition, customers presented sessions on MergeComm, web chat, miSecureMessages, and Intelligent Series.

Attendees shared positive comments about the seminar, including, “Excellent”; “I look forward to what you come up with for next year”; “the Amtelco team has a knack for facilitating an approachable networking environment”; “Friends and family: Never change this! Too few companies understand this”; “I learned something at all the sessions”; “Intrigued by the endless possibilities of MergeComm”; and “Each session was a learning experience.”

Next year’s 1Call Leadership and Training Seminar will be held in Madison, Wisconsin, on September 18–20, 2018, in a new location at The Park Hotel, on Madison’s Capitol Square. Learn more at 800-225-6035 or seminars@1call.com.


A Thought for Today

“Do unto those downstream as you would have those upstream do unto you.” -Wendell Berry

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The Promise of Telephone Triage and Physician Locator Services

By Peter L DeHaan, Ph.D.

Peter DeHaan, publisher and editorTelephone triage is a great solution that meets the healthcare needs for many patients. However, though I write about telephone triage, I have no first-hand experience. Alas, there are no telephone triage services available to me—or at least none that I’m aware of. I wish there were.

It may shock you to know I don’t have a primary care physician. But it’s not for a lack of trying. Here’s the short version: Years ago I called my doctor’s office to make an appointment when I was down with a cold. The doctor wouldn’t see me because I hadn’t recently seen him when I was well. When I was better I called to schedule an annual check-up. They declined. My paper records were in storage and apparently it was too much hassle to retrieve them. I suggested they treat me as a new patient, but my doctor wasn’t accepting new patients. Apparently he had fired me. That was ten years ago. I haven’t had a primary care physician since.

Over the past five years I’ve required medical attention four times. Once was a trip to ER for stitches. The other three times were to urgent care to snag a prescription for antibiotics. On my last visit they encouraged me to find a primary care physician. I agreed. After recovering, I went online searching for a conveniently-located doctor.

I ended up at the website of a large healthcare provider. I entered my ZIP code and asked for doctors nearby. The closest match was .06 miles away. That’s 317 feet, but this doctor was actually over twenty miles away, a thirty-five-minute drive. I checked the next fifteen providers, all of whom were reported to be within five miles. None were. I gave up.

I wish I could call a physician locator service, but there aren’t any in my area, at least none that I know of.

I’m convinced healthcare call centers can fill a vital need in the provision of healthcare services, both telephone triage and doctor locator services. If only they were available in my area. Hopefully the reality of what is will soon catch up with the potential of what can be. Until then I hope I don’t get sick.

Peter DeHaan is the publisher and editor of Medical Call Center News and AnswerStat.

The September 2017 Issue



The Promise of Telephone Triage and Physician Locator Services

By Peter L DeHaan, Ph.D.

Peter DeHaan, publisher and editorTelephone triage is a great solution that meets the healthcare needs for many patients. However, though I write about telephone triage, I have no first-hand experience. Alas, there are no telephone triage services available to me—or at least none that I’m aware of. I wish there were.

It may shock you to know I don’t have a primary care physician. But it’s not for a lack of trying. Here’s the short version: Years ago I called my doctor’s office to make an appointment when I was down with a cold. The doctor wouldn’t see me because I hadn’t recently seen him when I was well. When I was better I called to schedule an annual check-up. They declined. My paper records were in storage and apparently it was too much hassle to retrieve them. I suggested they treat me as a new patient, but my doctor wasn’t accepting new patients. Apparently he had fired me. That was ten years ago. I haven’t had a primary care physician since.

Over the past five years I’ve required medical attention four times. Once was a trip to ER for stitches. The other three times were to urgent care to snag a prescription for antibiotics. On my last visit they encouraged me to find a primary care physician. I agreed. After recovering, I went online searching for a conveniently-located doctor.

I ended up at the website of a large healthcare provider. I entered my ZIP code and asked for doctors nearby. The closest match was .06 miles away. That’s 317 feet, but this doctor was actually over twenty miles away, a thirty-five-minute drive. I checked the next fifteen providers, all of whom were reported to be within five miles. None were. I gave up.

I wish I could call a physician locator service, but there aren’t any in my area, at least none that I know of.

I’m convinced healthcare call centers can fill a vital need in the provision of healthcare services, both telephone triage and doctor locator services. If only they were available in my area. Hopefully the reality of what is will soon catch up with the potential of what can be. Until then I hope I don’t get sick.

Peter DeHaan is the publisher and editor of Medical Call Center News and AnswerStat.


Reduce Unnecessary ER Visits with Telephone Triage

By Charu Raheja, PhD

Telemedicine has been gaining acceptance as a means of lowering healthcare costs and decreasing the unnecessary use of the ER. Telephone nurse triage has become part of the telemedicine solution. By using standardized protocols to advise patients on their symptoms and indicate the appropriate care, triage nurses decrease unnecessary ER visits, resulting in significant annual healthcare savings. In addition, having nurses as the first line of care encourages patients to call since patients aren’t sure if they need a doctor to evaluate their symptoms.

Unnecessary ER visits cost patients, hospitals, and insurance companies approximately 4.4 billion dollars a year according to the RAND Corporation. This problem has become such an issue that earlier this summer Blue Cross Blue Shield of Georgia told patients with individual policies that they will not cover ER claims if the patient doesn’t have a legitimate emergency. They recommend patients use urgent care centers, retail health clinics, and 24/7 telehealth services.

The improper use of ER places a high financial burden on the entire US healthcare system. With the US healthcare system in serious need of cost-cutting, there is increased pressure to minimize unnecessary use, while ensuring people who truly need care receive it in a timely manner, thereby reducing the potential for life-threatening conditions.

One important, but often overlooked aspects of nurse triage is the human aspect of the service. Most callers are truly concerned about their symptoms, and having access to a triage nurse provides reassurance and guidance. It’s difficult to put a price on peace of mind. In addition, some callers may not realize the severity of their symptoms and may fear being responsible for the ER bill, thus delaying care for potentially life-threatening conditions. About one in fourteen callers thought their symptoms weren’t serious prior to the nurse sending them to the emergency room. Providing patients with a qualified telephone triage nurse prevents these patients from improperly self-diagnosing and ensures that they get the treatment they need.

As telemedicine expands into new services, providing innovative and cost-effective care, it’s important to remember that the benefits reach beyond budgetary significance. Nurse triage saves lives and provides comfort to callers worried about their symptoms and would have otherwise gone to the ER. However, a significant portion of the US population lacks access to telephone nurse triage. Implementing telephone medicine to a greater population can save lives and improve health outcomes.

Charu Raheja, Ph.D., is the CEO of TriageLogic and Continuwell. Both companies focus on telehealth by integrating communication solutions with medical expertise. TriageLogic is a leading provider of quality, affordable triage solutions, including comprehensive URAC accredited after-hours call center services and innovative online systems for use in both institutional and private practice settings. Contact TriageLogic to get a quote or set up a demo.


Is it Time to Consider Hospital Call Center Outsourcing?

By Keith Slater

“Patient experience,” “customer service,” “patient satisfaction scores,” and “value-based performance” are part of hospitals’ and healthcare providers’ everyday vocabulary. Value-based care pushes them to achieve many more financial objectives and improve the patient experience. Providers who lose patients because of poor customer service or inefficient physician referral processes feel a direct hit on revenue and, ultimately, on the bottom line.

Plus, there’s another financial incentive to improve customer service. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) requires hospitals subject to the Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) annual payment update provisions to collect and submit data from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey to receive their full IPPS annual payment update. If they don’t, their annual payment update may be reduced by two percent. The HCAHPS survey measures patients’ perceptions of their hospital experiences, which include responsiveness of hospital staff and other service measures.

Balancing Customer Service and Clinical Care: Many hospitals and healthcare providers struggle to focus on the patient experience and customer service because of competing priorities. Value-based care; clinical, quality and safety initiatives; mergers and acquisitions; integrating employed physicians; software conversions and migrations; and supply management often monopolize their attention. Too often, they ignore call centers.

C-suite executives and leaders responsible for the patient experience are overburdened. Staff members often wear too many hats, leaving customer service and call centers to suffer. In most cases it’s not intentional. Healthcare organizations with in-house call centers don’t always monitor calls or track call metrics from a patient access or experience perspective. Many don’t realize they have a problem until revenue shortfalls and patient satisfaction scores show otherwise.

Signs of Medical Call Center Vulnerability: Perhaps the biggest reason in-house healthcare call centers fall short is because they’re not run like true call centers. It’s typical for a hospital or healthcare system to put existing front desk or scheduling staff in a central location to try to gain efficiencies and improve service. Many times they don’t emphasize the importance of excellence in customer service skills or invest in the rigor required to run a true call center.

Then they end up with unhappy employees, high staff turnover, and frustrated patients. Healthcare executives may not know when it’s time to pull the plug on a deficient call center and outsource those hospital call center services to a professional firm.

Why Medical Call Center Outsourcing Works: Running a call center requires specialized expertise—even more so when the calls entail patient questions about health issues and possible financial challenges. Outsourced medical call centers know how to hire representatives with good listening skills, a calm demeanor, a service mentality, and empathy for patients. They provide agents with ongoing, in-depth training on the medical aspects of the job and how to represent healthcare providers as if they were members of their clients’ staff. Good call center providers have advanced technology and tools to help ensure quality and report results.

Since 70 percent of all patient care occurs in a physician office setting and patients must call for appointment scheduling or to get their questions answered, why would you risk putting inadequate resources in place to manage your call center? Why not outsource to a professional healthcare call center that can get the job done?

Keith Slater is vice president of business development at Change Healthcare. Contact him at performanceinfo@mckesson.com. Download their new e-book to learn more about industry insights into patient satisfaction and key strategies to improving the total patient experience. For more information visit www.mckesson.com/callcenter.


Healthcare Call Center News

Ambs Call Center Honored For Excellence

Ambs Call Center received the ATSI 2017 Award of Excellence. This annual award is presented by the Association of TeleServices International (ATSI). Call centers from across North America and the United Kingdom take part in the program, which uses independent judges to place test calls to participating call centers. These secret-shopper calls occur over a six-month time frame. “Companies that earn this award are continuously focusing on delivering excellence in customer call handling,” said ATSI president Doug Robbins.

The award started twenty-one years ago to improve the quality of the telephone answering service industry. Now a fourteen-time winner Ambs Call Center earned the Emerald Award. “I am extremely proud of our team for earning this year’s award. Making sure that we deliver an exceptional customer service experience to our customers 24/7/365 is no small feat,” said Aaron Boatin, president of Ambs Call Center.

The healthcare division of Ambs Call Center provides medical answering service, patient satisfaction, physician referral, and class registration. Ambs Call Center is family owned and has been in business since 1932.

Schmitt-Thompson Clinical Content Joins the Air Force

Schmitt-Thompson Clinical Content (STCC) announced they have been awarded a ten-year agreement by the Air Force Medical Operations Agency (AFMOA) for the delivery of electronic triage protocols for telehealth nursing to medical treatment facilities enterprise-wide. This would entail a deployment over the next twelve months of the Office Hours content to all seventy-six Air Force military treatment facilities.

Each of the Air Force bases has a military treatment facility. Patients are seen in their walk-in clinics. Supplementing this is a triage telecom service (medical call center) with nurse staff ranging from as few as four telephone triage nurses per site (Air Force base) to as many as eighty-five nurses.


A Thought For Today

“An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made in a very narrow field.” -Niels Bohr

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The One Sure Thing About the Future of Healthcare

By Peter L DeHaan, Ph.D.

Peter DeHaan, publisher and editorI don’t like to write about politics, but politicians in the United States are once again messing with healthcare. Some call it repeal, and others view it as repair. Some are for it and others oppose it. No one knows for sure how things will shake out or when it will happen, if anything happens at all.

Whether you view the status quo as good or bad, the maneuverings of the politicians and the soundbites of the pundits are disruptive. This makes it hard to plan: hard for healthcare providers, hard for healthcare insurance companies, and hard for healthcare consumers.

Regardless of the outcome, however, there is one thing I’m sure of. Medical call centers will continue to play a key role in the provision of care now and a bigger role in the future. Healthcare call centers stand in the healthcare gap, improving patient care, enhancing population health, and reducing per capita healthcare costs. No group is better positioned to achieve these three goals.

Yes, the one sure thing in healthcare today is that medical call centers will play a key role in providing quality, cost-effective solutions tomorrow. The only variable is how big that role will be.

Peter DeHaan is the publisher and editor of Medical Call Center News and AnswerStat.

The July 2017 Issue



The One Sure Thing About the Future of Healthcare

By Peter L DeHaan, Ph.D.

Peter DeHaan, publisher and editorI don’t like to write about politics, but politicians in the United States are once again messing with healthcare. Some call it repeal, and others view it as repair. Some are for it and others oppose it. No one knows for sure how things will shake out or when it will happen, if anything happens at all.

Whether you view the status quo as good or bad, the maneuverings of the politicians and the soundbites of the pundits are disruptive. This makes it hard to plan: hard for healthcare providers, hard for healthcare insurance companies, and hard for healthcare consumers.

Regardless of the outcome, however, there is one thing I’m sure of. Medical call centers will continue to play a key role in the provision of care now and a bigger role in the future. Healthcare call centers stand in the healthcare gap, improving patient care, enhancing population health, and reducing per capita healthcare costs. No group is better positioned to achieve these three goals.

Yes, the one sure thing in healthcare today is that medical call centers will play a key role in providing quality, cost-effective solutions tomorrow. The only variable is how big that role will be.

Peter DeHaan is the publisher and editor of Medical Call Center News and AnswerStat.


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The Receptionist Model for Telephone Triage Calls

By Mark Dwyer

Many triage call centers employ non-clinical staff to frontend the triage calls. This process is often referred to as the receptionist model. Hospitals that use this model typically provide the non-clinical staff with a predefined set of criteria to rank the acuity level of patients’ symptoms. These acuity levels are determined by key symptoms and terms used by patients when describing their symptoms.

Certain keywords together with certain known related conditions shape a likely emergent disposition. This is often done by providing the non-clinical staff with a list of key symptoms and conditions. If they exist, then direct the individual processing the call to interrupt a nurse currently on a call with a less acute patient. In this scenario, the nurse parks the current call, freeing her line to accept the potentially urgent call. If the call is deemed non-emergent, it is added to the nurses’ follow-up outbound call queue with the appropriately assigned acuity.

The best way to verify that each call added into the nurse callback queue has been assigned an appropriate acuity level would be to have all calls reviewed, assessed and, if needed, adjusted by acuity. To facilitate this, many sites have a charge nurse responsible for managing the queue throughout the day, making sure the highest acuity requests remain listed at the top of the “requests received for nurse callback” queue. Generally, callbacks should be made within thirty to forty minutes of receipt of the initial request.

Mark Dwyer is a 30-year veteran of the healthcare call center industry and the COO at LVM Systems, which provides healthcare call center software.


Healthcare Call Center News

Hospital CIOs Surveyed about Data Security and Clinical Mobility

Over the past twenty years, the avenues for sharing protected health information have multiplied, and data breaches have become much too common. In March 2017, Spok surveyed over 100 hospital CIOs to see how pressing the data security concern is for IT executives. They compiled the results and some interesting ones include:

Hospital secure texting:

  • 41 percent do not currently support HIPAA-compliant secure texting on any device but are planning to do so in the future.
  • 39 percent have secure texting only for personal devices.
  • 35 percent supply secure texting only on hospital issued devices.
  • 26 percent provide secure texting on both personal and hospital issued devices.

Secure communication methods used by clinical staff:

  • 88 percent use encrypted email.
  • 48 percent use HIPAA-compliant secure texting.
  • 48 percent use in-building Wi-Fi phones.
  • 17 percent use encrypted pagers.

Top four reasons why hospitals use pagers:

  • Most appropriate device for specific employee groups or departments
  • Reliability
  • Cost and time savings
  • Easy workflow integration

To underscore the severity of this data security issue, 95 percent of hospital CIOs are concerned about their data being compromised, but 26 percent are unsure how much PHI (personal health information) is being shared using unsecure technology.

Mobility and clinical process improvements are important to hospital leaders, and CIOs plan to make impactful changes,” said Spok. “However, the execution remains a work in progress. Greater than 30 percent of clinical staff cannot receive messages from colleagues on mobile devices.” This and other findings are presented in a revealing info graphic.


A Thought for Today

“We all have our time machines. Some take us back, they’re called memories. Some take us forward, they’re called dreams.” -Jeremy Irons

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